Sunday, May 27, 2012

Pizza Pizza

I vividly remember not getting everything I wanted as a child. But when I look back at kitchen appliances, I was spoiled rotten. Here is a short list of appliances I asked for and subsequently received:
  • Grill Cheese Maker? Check. IT CREASES THE EDGES FOR GOODNESS SAKE.
  • Waffle Iron? Check.
  • Ice Cream Maker? Check.
  • Multiple George Foreman Grills with multifarious functions? Check and Check.
  • Raclette? Cheque.
  • Pizza Stone? Check.
Thinking about this makes me really thankful that I grew up with a family who fostered my love of cooking. UPDATE: I was reminded that I asked for a fry daddy (many times over), which I never received. Maybe there's something to be thankful for there too. 

Enough with the sap. Back to the pizza stone. I still have one and love to use. (Side note: Another great way to bake a pizza - use a cast iron skillet. Put the pizza in a preheated skillet, then bake it in the oven until the top is done. Then, put the skillet on a hot burner to crisp up the bottom.)


Kale, Sweet Potato, and Red Onion Pizza

When I make my own pizza dough, I usually opt for the recipe in my California Pizza Kitchen cookbook, but decided to try out a new recipe for whole wheat dough. While it doesn't quite capture all that is regular pizza dough, I still recommend it. 

I topped the dough with pesto, then loaded up pre-roasted sweet potatoes, red onions, and kale, a sprinkle of pine nuts, and finally mozzarella cheese. 

(For the veggie roasting, I sliced a sweet potato and red onion very thinly with a mandolin. I tore the kale into bite-sized pieces, removing all the tough spines. Then I topped everything with a bit of olive oil, salt, and pepper and roasted it in the oven at 350 for about 25 minutes.)

I baked the pizza on a pre-heated pizza stone at 500 for about 12 minutes. 

Pizza, pre-cheesed

Pizza, post-cheesed and post-baked

I had a ton of leftover veggies, so I turned them into another dish, orzo salad topped with mozzarella.